Grad Seminar: Mark Lipke, RU - Chemistry

November 1, 2022

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Redox Behavior and Reactivity of Soluble Porphyrin Nanocages and Other Molecular Materials  

 

Tuesday, November 1st, 2022, 12:10pm – 1:30pm EST 

In Person  |  CCR-201 (McLaren Center for Ceramic Research) 

Online  |  Zoom: https://go.rutgers.edu/rvumqje0  

Meeting ID: 952 8606 2826; Password: MSE 

 

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Dr. Mark Lipke 

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology 

Rutgers University 

 

Abstract 

Nano porous materials, such as MOFs, COFs, and discrete nanocages, are increasingly targeted as tunable supports for molecular electrocatalysts. The pores of these materials provide new opportunities for tuning catalytic activity but also raise challenging mechanistic questions since the confined pore environment must rearrange to accommodate electrochemical changes. This talk will describe the development of porphyrin-walled nanocages as soluble model structures for examining how nanoconfined environments respond to redox changes. These cages exhibit rich redox-responsive host-guest chemistry that was used to probe proton-coupled and other cation-coupled redox processes in these structures, providing insights about how key steps of electrocatalytic transformations might be altered in nanoporous materials. The reactivity and catalytic activity of metal sites embedded in the walls of the cages will also be described. Time permitting, the redox behavior, electronic structure, and physical properties of electronically delocalized cobalt complexes will be described, with a focus on how these complexes might be useful for developing self-assembled conductive materials. 

 

Biography 

Mark Lipke earned his B.S. in chemistry from Case Western Reserve University in 2008, where he first got involved in research working with John Protasiewicz. Mark earned his PhD in 2013 studying novel ruthenium-silane complexes in the group of Don Tilley at UC Berkeley. He then moved on to a postdoc at Northwestern University studying redox-responsive molecular nanomaterials with Sir Fraser Stoddart. Professor Lipke began his independent career at Rutgers (New Brunswick) in 2017 where his research combines his interests in transition metal reactivity and redox-active nanomaterials. 

Contact Nahed Assal at nahed.assal@rutgers.edu for more information. 

Phone: 848-445-1651